Thursday, April 21, 2016

SCI Model System Researchers Participate in the 2016 American Spinal Injury Association Annual Scientific Meeting

A host of SCI model systems researchers presented and delivered lectures to advance the field of spinal cord injury at the 2016 American Spinal Injury Association Scientific Meeting held in Philadelphia, PA from April 14-16, 2016. The following SCI model systems researchers have submitted conference presentation information to the MSKTC:
 
New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center  
  • Alan Jette, PhD, PT, principal investigator for the New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center served as a panel member during the Demographics/Measurement session and presented, SCI-FI/AT Short Forms Achieve High Measurement Reliability.
  • David Rosenblum, MD, co-principal investigator for the New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center  presented the poster, New England Spinal Cord Injury Toolkit: In Theory and In Practice. This poster covers the development and usage methods of the SCI Toolkit as well as feedback and future plans for the resource.
  • Bethlyn Houlihan, associate director of the New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center presented the poster, Strategies for Peer Telecounseling: Opening the Black Box in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury. This poster highlights process data trends from a recently completed site-specific randomized control trial, My Care My Call, a peer-led telehealth intervention aimed to empower individuals to address their primary healthcare needs.
Rocky Mountain Regional Spinal Injury System
  • Susan Charlifue, PhD, FISCoS, FACRM, co-project director of the Rocky Mountain Regional Spinal Injury System presented Reinventing Yourself After SCI: An Educational Intervention to Enhance Self-Efficacy Skills.
  • Daniel Lammertse, MD, co-project director of the Rocky Mountain Regional Spinal Injury System presented Diaphragm Pacing Follow Up.
South Florida Spinal Cord Injury Model System
  • Elizabeth Roy Felix, PhD, project director of South Florida Spinal Cord Injury Model System presented, Effectiveness of an At-home Exercise Program on Shoulder Pain and Pathology. The objective of this presentation was to discuss results of the STOMPS strengthening protocol for improving shoulder pain in persons with SCI and evaluate quantitative ultrasound measures of supraspinatus tendon health before and after STOMPS program.
  • Mark Nash PhD, co-principal investigator of South Florida Spinal Cord Injury Model System presented, Energy Expenditure and Fuel Homeostasis During and After a Single Bout of Circuit Resistance Exercise in Persons with and without Spinal Cord Injury. The objective of this presentation is to analyze fuel use during and following exercise in persons with paraplegia and tetraplegia.
  • Elizabeth Roy Felix, PhD and George Mejia-Galvis, MD from the South Florida Spinal Cord Injury Model System presented the poster, Demographic factors affecting the development of neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain after SCI.
Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center of the Delaware Valley
  • Ralph Marino, MD, project director of the Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center of the Delaware Valley presented, Responsiveness of the Capabilities of Upper Extremity Test at the General Session. This presentation assessed the responsiveness of the Capabilities of Upper Extremity Test (CUE T). Dr. Marino also presented, Spinal Cord Injury Exam and Classification at the Spine Symposium. 
Northern New Jersey Spinal Cord Injury System (NNJSCIS)
  • Steven Kirshblum, MD co-director of the Northern New Jersey Spinal Cord Injury System gave two lectures titled, When You Come to a Fork in the Road: Lessons Learned and a Map for the Future and Patterns of Sacral Sparing Components and Neurological Recovery in Newly Injured Persons with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

Friday, March 18, 2016

SCI Model System Center Publishes Seven Manuscripts

Recent publications by Investigators from the University of Michigan Spinal Cord Injury Model System.

Rodriguez GM. Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. FEB 2016;97(2):339-340. URL: http://www.archives-pmr.org/article/S0003-9993(15)01146-6/pdf

Cameron AP. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy. Translational Andrology and Urology. FEB 2016;5(1):51-62. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4739981/pdf/tau-05-01-051.pdf

Nevedal A, Kratz AL, Tate DG. Women's experiences of living with neurogenic bladder and bowel after spinal cord injury: life controlled by bladder and bowel. Disability and Rehabilitation. 2016;38(6):573-581. URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.3109/09638288.2015.1049378

Drossel C, Forchheimer M, Meade MA. Characteristics of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury Who Use Cannabis for Therapeutic Purposes. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation. WIN 2016;22(1):3-12.

 Fyffe D, Kalpakjian CZ, Slavin M, Kisala P, Ni P, Kirshblum SC, Tulsky DS, Jette AM. Clinical interpretation of the Spinal Cord Injury Functional Index (SCI-FI). The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine. e-pub date: 05 FEB 2016 URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/10790268.2015.1133483

Richardson EJ, Brooks LG, Richards JS, Bombardier CH, Barber J, Tate D, Forchheimer MB, Fann JR. Changes in pain and quality of life in depressed individuals with spinal cord injury: does type of pain matter? The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine. 2016; e-pub date: 04 MAR 2016. URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/10790268.2016.1151145

Williams R, Heinemann A, Neumann HD, Fann JR, Forchheimer M, Richardson E, Bombardier CH. Evaluating the Psychometric Properties and Responsiveness to Change of Three Depression Measures in a Sample of Persons with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury and Major Depressive Disorder. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. e-pub date: 06 FEB 2016. URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2016.01.017

Thursday, January 7, 2016

Using Social Media to Promote your Research: MSKTC Suite of Tools and Information

MSKTC produced a webinar titled Using Social Media to Promote Your Research; a recording of the webinar is available here: http://www.msktc.org/Model-Systems-Grantees/webinars. This webinar was designed to help the attendees understand the pervasiveness of social media; understand who uses social media; learn about the uses for different social media platforms; think about what they can do with social media; learn about the steps needed to manage social media; and see how a few Model Systems are effectively using their own social media. As a follow up to this webinar, researchers can develop a social media strategic plan using the following three tools developed by the MSKTC:

  • Guide for Developing an MSKTC Social Media Plan: This document is a go-to reference for researchers to navigate different social media platforms and to plan, execute, monitor and optimize their social media efforts;
  • MSKTC Social Media Development Workbook: This workbook accompanies the Guide to help researchers work through all aspects of a social media plan to communicate about their research;
  • MSKTC Social Media Development Content Calendar: This Excel sheet helps researchers map out their use of social media by adapting it to the frequency with which they plan to use social media.
The tools can be found here: http://www.msktc.org/Knowledge-Translation/Social-Media-Guide.

In addition to the webinar and tools developed by MSKTC, a web clinic on social media analytics was held to review the types of analytics available for three platforms: Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Participants discussed how to use that data to inform and improve research dissemination and outreach through social media. The web clinic introduced best practices in using analytics, measuring engagement through analytics, creating data reports, and knowing what questions to ask of the researcher’s organization if they do not manage their own social media platforms. A recording of the web clinic is available here: http://www.msktc.org/Model-Systems-Grantees/webinars.

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Work of a Model System Researcher Published in Multiple Publications

Yu-Ying Chen, MD, PhD, researcher at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) was published in three journals: Journal of Urology, Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, and Spinal Cord. View the citations and abstracts below.

  • Nahm LS, Chen Y, DeVivo MJ. LK Lloyd. Bladder cancer mortality after spinal cord injury over 4 decades. J Urol 2015;193(6):1923-1928. View abstract.
  • Chen Y, Tang Y, Allen V, DeVivo MJ. Aging and spinal cord injury: External causes of injury and implications for prevention. Top Spinal Cord Inj Rehab 2015;21(3):218-226. View abstract.
  • Biering-Sørensen F, Alai S, Anderson K, Charlifue S, Chen Y, DeVivo M, Flanders A, Jakeman L, Jones L, Kleitman N, Lans A, Noonan VK, Odenkirchen J, Steeves J, Tansey K, Widerström-Noga E. Common data elements for spinal cord injury clinical research: a National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke Project. Spinal Cord 2015;53:265-277. View abstract.

Friday, July 24, 2015

Historic Gathering of 40 and 50-year SCI Survivors

On June 7, 2015, the spinal cord injury (SCI) research team from the Medical University of South Carolina, under the leadership of Dr. James Krause, held a historic celebration in Minneapolis Minnesota, bringing together about study participants and guests, including 10 SCI survivors who are more than 50 years post-injury. The more than 50 people with SCI in attendance averaged 41.8 years post-injury and only a handful were less than 30 years post-injury. The event commemorated and celebrated 40 years of research for this study, initiated by Dr. Nancy Crewe, at the University of Minnesota in 1973. The celebration was held in Nicollet Island Pavilion on the Mississippi River in downtown Minneapolis.

Former President of the National SCI Association, John Schatzlein, received the Career Contributions Award, much to the delight of the attendees, many of whom he had known for nearly 50 years and for whom he has served as a peer mentor. Barbara Armour was presented with the Longevity after Injury Award, having reached 58 years since the onset of her SCI. Other awards were given, including the Community Contributor Award to Margo Imdieke Cross, who has spent countless hours advocating for accessible environments in Minnesota, Staff Lifetime Contributor Award [presented posthumously] and to Sarah Lottes, who had a tireless commitment to SCI and who literally worked with the research team until the day she died in February at age 72. Laurel Cibick accepted a plaque of appreciation on behalf of her mother, Dr. Nancy Crewe, who initiated the study.

The collective accomplishments of the participants are amazing. There have been 2200+ participants since the study’s inception in 1973 and they have collectively worked for over 12,500 years, logging more than 22,000,000 hours of gainful employment.

Several current and former participants were recognized for their outstanding individual accomplishments, including Dr. David Gray, who was one of true pioneers of disability rights and a leader in SCI research, both as an investigator and presidential appointee as Director of the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Dr. Gray also passed away in February, and he had been the first individual to plan on attending the event, saying “I will be there”. He was there in spirit, as were so many others.

The event was a reminder of the magnitude of accomplishments by so many people with SCI. Dr. James Boen wrote the book The World’s Oldest Living Quadriplegic prior to his death for having lived 56 years with SCI, a total eclipsed by two current participants. Larry Kegan was a boyhood friend of Bob Dylan and played on stage with him. Other individuals have written books, including Robert Peters (A Dive Too Deep) and Mike Patrick (I Still Believe in Tomorrow). Darcy Pohland was a television reporter for a local news station.

When the study was initiated in 1973, living 40 years with SCI was viewed as unattainable, yet there were 26 people at the event to have lived more than 40 years with SCI. Those attending were proud of their involvement with research since knowledge gained from their participation has helped us to better understand SCI and the changes that occur as people age with SCI.
If someone wonders what they can do after SCI, they need only to look to what this group of people has done. They have lived and participated in their communities, been in long-term relationships, and worked to better their lives and the lives of others. All has been accomplished despite the harsh health consequences of SCI and aging, and the barriers to marriage and employment that often come with needing financial assistance for the high cost of SCI.

This was a truly inspiring event, even for those of us who have lived for decades with SCI. Our study participants have faced many unique challenges, but despite that, have worked tirelessly to make this world a better place for all of us with SCI. Together, we have worked to facilitate accessible environments, promote employment, and advocate for policies that create opportunities. We look forward to the next generation of people with SCI building upon these accomplishments and with hope for anyone with SCI that they have the opportunity to live long, healthy, and fulfilling lives.

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

SCI Model System Researchers Work Published in Archives of Physical Medicine

Researchers and collaborators from the University of Michigan Spinal Cord Injury Model System (U-M SCIMS) co-authored six recently published articles in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. See the publications and abstracts below.

Klyce, D. W., Bombardier, C. H., Davis, T. J., Hartoonian, N., Hoffman, J. M., Fann, J. R., & Kalpakjian, C. Z.. (2015). Distinguishing grief from depression during acute recovery from spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Advance online publication. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.02.018

View abstract here.

Richards, J. S., Bombardier, C. H., Wilson, C. S., Chiodo, A., Brooks, L., Tate, D. G., Temkin, N. R., … Fann, J. R. (2015). Efficacy of Venlafaxine XR for the treatment of pain in patients with spinal cord injury and major depression: A randomized, controlled trial. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 96(4), 680-689. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2014.11.024

View abstract here.

Saunders, L. L., Clarke, A., Tate, D. G., Forchheimer, M., & Krause, J. S. (2015). Lifetime prevalence of chronic health conditions among persons with spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 96(4), 673-679. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2014.11.019

View abstract here.

McCullumsmith, C. B., Kalpazian, C., Richards, J. S., Forchheimer, M., Heinemann, A., Richardson, E., Wilson, C., … Bombardier, C. H. (2015). Novel risk factors associated with current suicidal ideation and lifetime suicide attempt in individuals with spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Advance online publication. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2014.12.017

View abstract here.

Tate, D. G., Forchheimer, M., Bombardier, C. H., Heinemann, A. W., Neumann, H. D., & Fann, J. R. (2015). Differences in quality of life outcomes among depressed spinal cord injury trial participants. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 96(4), 340-348. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2014.09.036

View abstract here.

Huggins, J. E., Moinuddin, A. A., Chiodo, A. E., & Wren, P. A. (2015). What would brain-computer interface users want: Opinions and priorities of potential users with spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 96(3), S38-S45. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2014.05.028

View abstract here.

Model System Researcher to Serve as Keynote Speaker at International Conference

Michael L. Boninger, M.D., director of the University of Pittsburgh Model System on Spinal Cord Injury, will serve as keynote speaker at the 2015 Rehab Week Valencia about the research prize for the Fürst Donnersmarck Foundation on the field of neuro-rehabilitation. The prize is awarded for current scientific research work in the field of neurological rehabilitation of people with acquired damage to the nervous system. The focus of the work should be on post-clinical long-term rehabilitation, and we are particularly interested in interdisciplinary rehabilitation strategies and methods, as well as the examination of scientific effectiveness and efficiency (outcome research), and how these developments meet the special needs of rehabilitation providers, funding bodies and political institutions (socio-economic effects). Learn more about the prize below.

The Board of Trustees of the Fürst Donnersmarck-Foundation Berlin, which is dedicated to the rehabilitation of people with physical and multiple disabilities, awards a research prize for neuro-rehabilitation.The prize money of EUR 30,000 can be distributed between more than one winner. An additional five commendations may also be awarded in the amount of EUR 3,000.

The prize is awarded for current scientific research work in the field of neurological rehabilitation of people with acquired damage to the nervous system. The focus of the work should be on post-clinical long-term rehabilitation, and we are particularly interested in interdisciplinary rehabilitation strategies and methods, as well as the examination of scientific effectiveness and efficiency (outcome research), and how these developments meet the special needs of rehabilitation providers, funding bodies and political institutions (socio-economic effects).

You may submit academic dissertations and theses, published project reports, book publications and specialist journal articles which have been completed within the past two years. The prize will be awarded by the Board of Trustees of the foundation on the basis of the recommendation of a jury made up of scientists and doctors working in the field of rehabilitation.
In your application, please enclose the following documents as pdf-files:

1. The scientific paper(s) or dissertation, with a summary
2. A justification for the submission in terms of the goals of the prize
3. Curriculum vitae with scientific career
The decision of the trustees is final and cannot be contested.

Applications must be submitted by 30 June 2015 to: forschungspreis@fdst.de

For further information please click on www.fdst.de/researchprize-2015-the-announcement/